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“What’s in It for Us?” An action-research case study of Nigeria’s extractive industries

AN ACTION-RESEARCH CASE STUDY OF NIGERIA’S EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES
Nigeria’s 65 years of oil and gas production have made it Africa’s largest producer. With almost 40 billion barrels of proven oil reserves, its economy is heavily dependent on hydrocarbon exports. Operating extractive companies including subsidiaries of Chevron, CNOOC (China), Eni, Equinor, ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA have paid billions of dollars towards development in the Niger Delta. But the money brings few if any benefits for impoverished communities living in this highly polluted region.

What’s in It for Us?” An action-research case study of Nigeria’s extractive industries uses companies’ payments-to-governments reporting and Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) data as a starting point to investigate Nigeria’s oil, gas and mining sector.

Based on joint work by Policy Alert and PWYP UK, the report documents public consultations with affected communities, social media communications and dialogue, and policy interventions. It incorporates research by Stakeholder Democracy Network into oil companies’ environmental performance in the Niger Delta.

The study links close to Policy Alert’s #WetinWeGain campaign. We highlight key findings and recommendations for the Nigerian and other governments, extractive companies, civil society, host communities, and international financial and multilateral institutions and donors.  As Nigeria and hydrocarbon operators increasingly face risks from climate-induced stranded assets as the world transitions to low-carbon energy, sector-wide transparency is as important as ever.

Download the executive summary here.

Download the full report here.

Read the press release.

 

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